Archives for posts with tag: John Maloof

A closer look on what held Vivian Maier back to publish her posthumously acclaimed street photography work unveils parallels to a very modern dilemma. To be honest, we’ve all become data junkies, aimlessly stacking digital media just as the nanny used to stack her (mostly undeveloped, unseen) visual material. Nowadays, every new app, every new technical device invites us to produce more of the global amalgamation of data junk. And yet we are rarely invited to meditate about what we produce, why we do so, and what we could renounce to do in order to focus our energy on something more worthwhile.

Learning from Vivian Maier urban street chronicle
So let Vivian Maier speak to you, a “socialist worker style” woman with her favorite hat and a shaded, enigmatic glance. Listen: she might tell you about her life, her regrets and unfulfilled wishes. She could talk about her experiences on the streets of Chicago, or maybe not, knowing her photos do the job better than words ever would.

Learning from Vivian Maier creativity imitate to learn
…maybe she wouldn’t talk to you at all. In front of the incredible audience that she got now, I guess she would rather choose to rest in amazement. Eyes intently fixed on what she never expected to happen, she would finally realize how many people are actually seeing her, speaking through countless picture frames. Whoever sees and likes Vivian Maier’s work nowadays can testify what an astounding effect a layman’s visual work can have, once it is physically there, for the world to see.
Learning from Vivian Maier creative pen and paper
Now, it’s your turn. Time to take that deep breath of self acknowledgment: If you are reading this, needless to say, you are alive. If so, you got a blissful prospect to fill, with dreams and actions as well. No matter your age and your condition, there is something essential to realize: Nobody is resourceless.
Learning from Vivian Maier creativity blogging community ressources
Even in the truthful realization of a lack lies the power to search for a compensation, for help. And there has never been a better time to search for each other, to connect and unite forces in order to get better things and projects done, better stories told. The making of “Finding Vivian Maier” is just one excellent example of it.

(Note: This 6th episode concludes the series “On Creativity: Learning from Vivian Maier”. Your comments are very welcome, I’m curious to know what you think.)

For me, the key to Vivian Maier’s story is not her posthumous success. Her visual work is there for us to see and to remind ourselves of what we care about. Concluding this, I care to give a shout-out to the many people whose talents remain locked and whose works, professional or not, remain unseen.

Learning from Vivian Maier Zeitgeist-follower needs to publish
Vivian Maier never had the chance to interact with her (potential) public, so her story is a sad one, regardless of her late recognition we are witnessing. For us, though, now is the time to publish our doings and to interact with whoever might be interested in what we do and what we like. Our lifetime is the precious moment to enjoy our own creativity. And we rarely live up to the potential of our own skills. I often notice that people don’t acknowledge their own skills because what one is able to do well always seems so normal, natural to oneself.

Learning from Vivian Maier visual talent displayed
If you want a film to make a difference in your life, put some metaphoric thought glasses on when you see this documentary. Ask yourself: “What exactly made Vivian Maier resourceless? And to what extent do I resemble her?”
Learning from Vivian Maier through metaphoric thought glasses
(tbc: The 6th episode will conclude this series.)

As in any other art business, the path to publish and gain visibility often requires faculties that are not directly linked to the art & craft a specific artist masters. So, no matter the quality of your product, you don’t necessarily know how to approach people in order to market it. More concretely: Vivian Maier had no idea how to turn a hangar full of negatives into paper prints.

Learning from Vivian Maier Archiving the essence of urban life
After developing the photos, John Maloof chose a modern way to expose her work, by putting it on tumblr and letting the internet audience decide about the quality. Positive resonance received, he probably gained enough motivation to pursue the search of suited exhibition platforms, and despite the daunting task, he finally was successful.

Learning from Vivian Maier Finding the audience
(tbc)